To most people the word hacker is lent to the evil side of the Internet, however the term Hacker is very much misaligned, according to the people who built the computer world and developed the internet into what it is today; hackers are problem solvers and very creative and good people indeed.

Hackers describe themselves as a collective of people who add new and exciting things every day to enhance our online experience and can trace their history back through decades to the first time-sharing minicomputers and the earliest experiments.

Hackers are not confined to simply coding and web design, they are ever present in Science and Art and music, and regardless of your field of expertise hackers are a kindred spirit who can recognise contributions to the World Wide Web collectively.

The good the bad and the Ugly

The term hacker however fills many uninitiated people with dread as they see hackers has as online burglars who can find your information and steal your identity which is really insulting a real hackers intelligence, why would they steal Mr. Average’s identity, when there are so many bigger fish they could catch if they really wanted to especially if the same effort and experience is required? Real hackers call these bad people ‘Crackers’ and consider them to be lazy, irresponsible, and not very bright at all.

It’s another case of where mainstream media has attached a label to something without much fore-thought and diligence behind it.

Hackers and Crackers are two different sides of the same coin and they hate one another.

The basic difference is this: hackers build things, crackers break them.

If you would like to be part of an incredible community of people who bring amazing things and new ideas to the internet everyday then keep reading if you want to be a cracker go and watch some Star Wars movies and learn about how far hate takes you, and start watching some Jail break movies because you will need all the help you can get!

The Hacker’s code

Hackers are an ecosystem and thrive of one another’s combined wisdom, it’s a brotherhood to bring calm to problems and find hacks (answers) to issues on the internet together through the open source community.  You have to be selfless and work for a combined goal and never for a singular cause.

hackers Brotherhood on Biz-find

Hackers Brotherhood

A dogma that could serve well for all people in power to learn!

The learning curve

Most hackers are not paid as such, they thrive on the combined goal of solving a problem as a group. One hacker could present a problem that they are having in their work and a team of hackers work together to find the answer without pay, but the final reward is teamwork, knowledge, experience and learning that everyone gets through the teamwork and to know that all answers are out there to all problems. Similarly, to be a hacker you have to get a basic thrill from solving problems, sharpening your skills, and exercising your intelligence. If you are not a team player you will never be a good hacker.

You also have to develop a kind of faith in your own learning capacity — a belief that even though you may not know all of what you need to solve a problem, if you tackle just a piece of it and learn from that, you’ll learn enough to solve the next piece — and so on, until you’re done.

There are no secrets between genuine hackers, you may inadvertently stumble on a piece of magical code that solves one major crisis and could make you rich, but if you are in it for the money then you are not a hacker.

However you don’t have to believe that you’re obligated to give all your creative product away, though the hackers that do are the ones that get most respect from other hackers. It’s consistent with hacker values to sell enough of it to keep you in food and rent and computers. It’s fine to use your hacking skills to support a family or even get rich, as long as you don’t forget your loyalty to your art and your fellow hackers while doing it.

computer learning on Biz-find

Computer learning and experience

Not just for Nerds

Real hackers have a big EQ (Emotional Quotient), not usually associated with tech people, but underneath it all they have big hearts and they want to solve problems so that ordinary non nerdy people can use and manage well. One such hacker ideal being; to go beyond a simple hack for their fellow hackers, but to make solutions so user friendly and easy for anyone to use.

Hacker’s freedom

The code, like the matrix can fall into the hands of the wrong people, so all hackers live with an ethic which is never to be dominated or bullied and, given the way many authoritarian minds work, anyone who can give you orders can stop you from solving whatever problem you’re burning the candle at both ends for and loving it, will generally find some appallingly stupid reason to do so. So the authoritarian attitude has to be fought wherever you find it, lest it smother you and other hackers.

The elite love control and the freedom that hackers as an entity of thousands enjoy  will always be under threat from manipulation by those who wish to ‘control’ the majority for more sinister means. Hackers are more than just coders who see answers to micro problems, they have a deep understanding of what they can achieve good and bad for the whole world, so it’s important to all hackers to listen to their one consciousness and ‘do no evil’

Real hackers are the reason why you found that amazing free plug in and why the internet gets better and better each day and they are good people whose control of or daily life runs deeper and deeper than you can imagine. Yet they never take adulation, as the one thing that makes a hacker is the very word means they are all one never an individual. We could all learn a lot from hackers.

computer freedom on Biz-find

Computer freedom on Biz-find

Are all hackers good? Nope, and Alan Watson’s fictional novel Hidden Assets bears a lot of truth about how important the internet and the integrity of hackers can be.

Hidden Assents by Alan Watson

Hidden Assents by Alan Watson

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